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Activities

Make your own version of A New World View

In this activity, you will use plaster of paris to create a panel similar to the glass panels that make up A New World View.

You will need:

  • Small plastic container with a flat bottom. A Tupperware sandwich container works great
  • A can of play-doh. The panel will absorb some color from the play-doh, so consider this when choosing the color. You can also paint the panel once it is dry.
  • Plaster of Paris dry mix
  • Bucket or bowl in which to mix Plaster of Paris
  • Water
  • String
  • Objects to make impressions with--such as figurines, buttons, cookie cutters, small balls, etc.

1. Begin by spreading a thick, smooth layer of play-doh along the bottom of the container. You should use about one can per container, assuming it is about the size of a sandwich container.

2. Push the desired object(s) one-half to one centimeter deep in the play-doh, and then remove them.

3. Mix up the Plaster of Paris according to the directions on the package. Once the mixture is smooth, pour enough of it into the container to cover all of the play-doh with a layer at least two centimeters thick.

4. Cut a piece of string and knot it into a loop. Push one end of the loop into the Plaster of Paris near the top and leave the other end sticking out of the panel. This creates a hanger for your panel.

5. Let the plaster dry and set according to directions on the package. Once the plaster is ready, wiggle the sides of the container to loosen them from the plaster. Then, carefully remove the panel from the container.

6. Remove the play-doh from the panel and decorate as desired.

In the classroom: Have each student make a panel that represents something he/she learned in science class this year. Then, hang the panels in columns like A New World View for all to see. This is a great opportunity to talk to your class about the importance of communicating science and the many creative ways that it can be done.


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